16 September 2012

Prelude to US Entering WWII 73 Years Ago

The 1939 United Press news article quoted below, precedes our declaring war on Nazi Germany in what was to become World War II. American troops, with exception of some who went to England to get an early start, had not yet begun to fight. 

Conscription was not yet a reality. The draft had not yet become standard for men of the USA. The first draft registration for World War II was held September 16, 1940 for all men between 21 and 36 years of age.

What follows is a complete, albeit brief, UP news article, with regard to Adolph Hitler's Nazi party, the NSDAP (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei).


NAZIS PREPARE TO RESUME WAR
Hitler Ultimatum Friday; Berlin Anticipates Rejection
ALL AVAILABLE GERMAN TROOPS RUSHED TO WEST
Hitler to Personally Overtake Warsaw; Address Reichstag Friday Noon 
BERLIN (UP) -- Hitler flew to Warsaw Thursday to take over the Polish Capital in the name of his Nazi Reich. He was expected back Thursday night to complete the draft of a speech he proposed to make at noon tomorrow before the Nazi Reichstag and in which was expected he would deliver a 'peace ultimatum' to Great Britain and France to stop the European war.
Meanwhile Germany is reported rushing in available troops and warplanes to the western front in anticipation of the Western Allies’ rejection of the last 'concrete peace proposal' which the fuehrer will announce in a speech to the Reichstag Friday noon.
Within the next two or three days, it was said, the greater part of Field Marshall Hermann W. Goering’s air force that engulfed Poland would be poised in the West, awaiting Hitler’s word to unleash devastating attacks. 
The order from Hitler, according to well-informed Nazis, would depend entirely upon the reaction of Great Britain and France to his Friday speech.
Travelers arriving from the West told of long trains and motor convoys moving westward. Tens of thousands of troops were said to be moving into positions in the west wall of fortifications.
Ending World War II in Europe, German General Alfred Jodl is shown signing documents of unconditional surrender at American General Eisenhower's headquarters in Reims, France.


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